Blog Archives

Creative Thinking – an example from Montclair State University

The Creative Thinking project at Montclair State University integrates the creative approaches of visiting artists into the intellectual and cultural environment of the campus via the development of a new course designed to help students in all academic areas harness their creative abilities.

Thoughts on the Montclair State University creative thinking course CRTH-151 with an administrator, a student, a mathematics professor, and an artist/systems designer:

Thoughts on the Montclair State University creative thinking course CRTH-151 with an administrator, a student, a mathematics professor, and an artist/systems designer

Playwright and director Robert Wilson talks about how a chance encounter with a deaf boy helped him create his first play and understand “how to hear:”

Playwright and director Robert Wilson talks about how a chance encounter with a deaf boy helped him create his first play and understand “how to hear.”

Read more about the Creative Thinking project ›


Provoking Thought, Discussion and Research – an example from California State University, Long Beach

Banned, Blacklisted and Boycotted: Censorship and the Response to It (The B-Word Project) was an 18-month campus-wide initiative, running from September 2011 through December 2012, at California State University, Long Beach. It presented performances and other activities to stimulate wide-ranging discussions that examine what happens when a voice—whether in artistic endeavors, journalism, scientific research or other areas—is stifled through governmental, commercial, or social restraints. The goal of the project is to provoke thought, discussion and research into the effects of censorship across all disciplines at Cal State Long Beach.

Learn more about the The B-Word Project ›


Tapping Into Community Needs – Class Divide, an example from Dartmouth University

Class Divide

Dartmouth University’s Hopkins Center’s three-year Class Divide project was conceived as a cross-campus / community programming initiative intended to raise awareness and spark discussion about socio-economic difference in communities throughout the Upper Valley region of New Hampshire and Vermont. Through a series of events, performances and residencies, the Hop aimed to both heighten their campus and community visibility, and to deepen their role in the higher education community at Dartmouth College. The Class Divide project began one-year prior to receipt of two-years of funding from the Creative Campus Innovations grant program.

Margaret Lawrence, Director of Programming, director Peter Sellars, faculty and students reflect on the Class Divide program:

Margaret Lawrence, Director of Programming, director Peter Sellars, faculty and students reflect on the Class Divide program.

Class discussion and analysis of educational impact:

Class discussion and analysis of educational impact.

Learn more about the program at Dartmouth College ›


Adding Community Engagement Programs

Several projects were conceived out of a desire to serve a specific population or stakeholder group, or a desire to work with a specific academic department. In most cases, this approach was amalgamated using an artist focus.

Read more about programmatic components ›

California State University, Long Beach, created a community engagement project called PROject/proJECT with videos done by high school students as part of a partnership with the YMCA Youth Institute.

What It’s Like by Barrier Breakers:

What It’s Like by Barrier Breakers.

What They Don’t Want Us to Know by Censor This:

What They Don’t Want Us to Know by Censor This.

See Hear Speak by Liberation Transmission:

See Hear Speak by Liberation Transmission.

Power of Words by Vyrus:

Power of Words by Vyrus.

Silence by Taboo:

Silence by Taboo.

Learn more about the PROject/proJECT ›

Wesleyan’s Feet to the Fire Program

Feet to the Fire is a major undertaking on Wesleyan’s campus to examine critical environmental issues through multiple lenses, from science to art. This program is dedicated to the proposition that a multidisciplinary examination that includes art will provide a more comprehensive and deeper understanding of these global issues.

Co-taught after school programs (at off-campus middle school):

Co-taught after school programs (at off-campus middle school).

Each year, Feet to the Fire presents programming that provides opportunities to engage with the arts and the environment simultaneously. Events and exhibitions often take the form of one-time performances by visiting artists, festivals, or gallery exhibitions. It is an occasion for the CFA to present artists whose work connects with the annual Feet to the Fire theme. It also allows for the campus and surrounding community at-large to engage with the work of the artist and environmental topics.

Read more about the Center for the Arts’ community events ›

Music and Public Life: A Year-Long Campus and Community-Wide Exploration

Today, the private and public worlds of music often overlap and intersect in virtual networks, community musicking, and public policy. During the 2012–2013 academic year, Wesleyan University is celebrating and studying the sounds, words, and spirit of music in public at the local, national, and transnational levels through concerts, workshops, gatherings, and courses, all designed to cross disciplines and engage the campus and Greater Middletown communities.

Learn more about the Music and Public Life project ›


Integrating Creative Campus Elements Into Existing Campus-Wide Teaching Initiatives

Wesleyan integrates Creative Campus elements into existing campus-wide teaching initiatives and ongoing pedagogical exchange:

Wesleyan integrates Creative Campus elements into existing campus-wide teaching initiatives and ongoing pedagogical exchange.

Example of a co-taught course and co-created curriculum modules:

Example of a co-taught course and co-created curriculum modules.

Wesleyan’s Center for the Arts has developed two models for pedagogical collaboration between artists and non-artists. A course module is defined as two to four class sessions within an existing course in which the host of the course co-creates the module with an artist (or if the host is an artist, he/she co-creates the curriculum with a non-artist). Modules provide a way for campus presenters to move beyond the typical workshop or master class conducted by visiting artists and introduce artists into the classroom in a structured way.

Explore sample teaching module descriptions ›


Lessons Learned: California State University, Long Beach (CSULB)

Organizers of the project report – The name, The B-Word Project, worked. It begged the follow-up question, “What is that?” and later, became easy shorthand for those events. Students on campus have been overheard saying, “That’s a B-Word thing.” The name sounded edgy and seemed to resonate with CSULB students.

As a mechanism to make the campus aware of the Carpenter Center, the B-Word Project’s colorful, provocative banners placed throughout campus worked. On such a large campus, to be able to mention the B-Word Project anywhere and have everyone nod their heads in recognition is an almost un-heard-of feat. Of course, every sword has two edges. Some of our Steering Committee faculty members heard complaints from their department colleagues about “your” banners being inappropriate or too provocative. This was one of the first signs that we were doing something right with our censorship initiative!

Find out what worked and didn’t work in the B-Word Project at California State University, Long Beach ›


Lessons Learned: Dartmouth

The Hop at Dartmouth learned how to be more explicit with communication strategies, both with the visiting artists and with their public messaging about the initiative. During the Hop’s mid-point assessment, partners encouraged them to be bolder about the programmatic connections within Class Divide. Once the Hop explained their rationale behind the involvement of certain artists and guests, it became clearer to participants that there was intentionality behind all facets of the project. It was noted that the Class Divide logo was an important signifier for many partners as well.

Faculty meeting/discussion of central hub role of Dartmouth’s presenter and summary of working with multiple faculty/community partners to increase impact:

Faculty meeting/discussion of central hub role of Dartmouth’s presenter and summary of working with multiple faculty/community partners to increase impact.

Find out more about the lessons learned at Dartmouth ›


Resource Materials: Montclair State University

Montclair State University’s resources include videos, blogs and essays ›

Robert Wilson addresses Montclair State University students in the Creative Thinking course to talk about his creative process and inspirations:
Robert Wilson


Resource Materials: Wesleyan University

Wesleyan’s resources cover co-taught courses, for course modules, commissioned works, the eco-arts festival, the first-year common experience program and evaluation and documentation materials.

Wesleyan Common Moment 2012:
Wesleyan Common Moment 2012

Browse the Wesleyan resource materials ›


The B-Word Project and Censorship

Peace Press Graphics Exhibition:
CSULB Posters

Peace Press Survey:
CSULB Survey

Annual Comparative Literature Conference:
CSULB Annual Comparative Literature Conference

Bill T. Jones in Rehearsal:
CSULB Bill T. Jones in Rehearsal

Pre and Post Class Survey:
CSULB Pre and Post Class Survey

Sustainability A Continuum of Integration noting activities at the Carpenter Performing Arts Center (CPAC):
CSULB Sustainability